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Acer Aspire 5755 - Budget champ [Review]

Biswajit.HD

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The Acer Aspire 5755 sells for a maximum retail price of Rs. 29,999. For that price, the laptop makes a good case for a basic 15-inch laptop for home use - it has good hardware, decent feature set and delivers expected performance without disappointing a whole lot. It will be hard to get a similar configuration for a laptop sold by Dell, Lenovo, or HP, and with so many features.

Pros
Attractive price
Useful proprietary software
Choices of colour
Good performance

Cons
Single mouse button
Slightly washed out screen
Ordinary onboard sound, despite Dolby software



launched earlier this month, the 15-inch Acer Aspire 5755 is a brand new laptop range by the Taiwanese PC manufacturer. With the new Aspire 5755 range, Acer tries to add more value into laptops targeted at budget-conscious consumers. It sports the newer 2nd generation Intel Core i3-2310M 2.1-GHz processor, exclusive software like Dolby Advanced Audio V2, and a chiclet or isolated keyboard. All this at a bargain price. Let’s see what the new Acer Aspire 5755 has in store for us.

t’s built adequately as well. The Acer Aspire 5755 laptop’s screen is securely anchored to the twin hinges, it doesn’t shake while typing nor bend obnoxiously. The keyboard deck doesn’t dip or flex while typing and the keys don’t feel loose in any way. Although Acer has done a good job to hide the laptop’s predominant plastic appearance, its feel isn’t as good as the higher-priced Dell Inspiron 15R or Gateway ID59C. The 15-inch Aspire 5755 weighs 2.6-kg with a standard six-cell battery which is average for a laptop of that form factor.
The Acer Aspire 5755 laptop has a 15.6-inch glossy LED-backlit widescreen display that comes with a 1366 x 768 pixel resolution, standard 16:9 aspect ratio for most laptops these days optimized for viewing HD content. The screen is of ordinary quality with sufficient brightness and contrast levels, it performs well indoors. The Aspire 5755’s screen is evenly lit, though, and has average viewing angles. However, watching movies, videos and text was good without much disappointment -- colours were a little washed out, not optimally saturated. On its top screen bezel sits an HD-enabled webcam which is good enough for videochats over Skype.
The Acer laptop sports a brand new keyboard layout -- isolated, chiclet styled keys exactly similar to the Acer TimelineX 5830TG’s keyboard design, but not seen on previous Aspire laptops. The keys are well spaced and are good to type on, having a different feel compared to the keyboards found on the Sony VAIO S, Lenovo IdeaPad U260 or Samsung RC510. Frequently used keys are easy to hit and the tactile feedback is nice. Of course, the Acer Aspire 5755 also bundles a dedicated number pad on the right -- rejoice all ye Microsoft Excel spreadsheet warriors! The direction keys, though, are a touch tiny and easy to miss-hit without practice. The palmrest is slightly raised -- like a VAIO S laptop -- to snuggle your wrists better while typing.
The touchpad is smooth with a matte finish and feels good to use. Its accompanying single strip mouse button is slightly clunky and takes time getting used to.


Acer Aspire 5755: Build & Design
It’s good to see that Acer’s laptops are no longer drab and boring, having just a blue-on-gray color combo on most of its Aspire laptops through 2008-09 and early 2010. With the Aspire 5755, Acer’s offering customers a choice of five different colours -- green, blue, brown, red and black. Our review sample had its screen lid covered in a black glossy surface which attracts fingerprints smudges -- try to pick a lighter colour to hide the smudges against reflected light. The Aspire 5755’s screen lid has a wavy pattern with the company’s logo embossed in the centre, and coupled with the keyboard deck and palmrest’s shiny gun grey finish, the laptop looks pretty decent -- definitely not boring.

Source : Digit magazine.
 
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